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Post Info TOPIC: Si Rangemaster?
Col


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Si Rangemaster?
 


Now there is an Si fuzz face type circuit (axis face III) that sounds very similar to a Ge version is it possible to get a Si rangemaster type device that sounds as good as a Ge one? I have built several treble boosters but the one I always use live is the Ge version as it sounds so much better despite the problems with temperature. One was reviewed in the UKs 'guitar magazine' last year but I can't find the article now. The reviewer said that the warm tones of a Ge device were present, all of the Si boosters I have built have had a great sound and can really lift a solo from the rest of the band in a live context but have the disadvantage of being 'cold'. They all have their uses, one that I really like is the 'sparkle boost' which can also overdrive giving some really good sounds but they just can't replace my rangemaster clone. 


What I really want is something that will not change it's sound no matter what the temperature is as I play both indoors and outdoors, while being stable no matter how long it is left switched on. I need it to give me that rich powerful boost I use for solos and some clean(ish) sections with reliability every time. 


Col



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Check out the Brian May Treble Booster project at Tonepad.  It's supposed to be a very convincing Silicon version of the Rangemaster that may be just right:

http://www.tonepad.com/project.asp?id=40

Phillip



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Axis Guitar Effects
Col


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Thanks for the reply. I built a Brian James Treble Booster (I think it has a BC182L transistor) and it does come close but it just hasn't got the richness of the Rangemaster clone. It does increase sustain and it has a nice smooth sound that I really like but it is just missing that something, and it isn't MOJO as the rest of the band notice the difference when I change, and for a load of punks playing high distortion music that must mean something.


I might try changing some of the resistors for trim pots and see if I can make any difference as the Brian May TB is a simple stripboard build and I bought some spare transistors at the time. I might also try different types of capacitor which will involve changing the layout. I can't socket the transistor as the 'L' version has a different pinout to most types and can't just be reversed as you can with most components of this type.


Alternatively we need a temperature stable Ge transistor!


That should keep me busy for a while!


Col



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You may want to try the RangeBlaster project, which is on my RangeMaster page.  It's a NPN Germanium version of the RangeMaster with a diode in there that helps to stabilize the Germanium transistor through a large temperature range.  Make a note that the diode across the base-emitter of the transistor HAS to be Germanium or it won't work as intended.

It can easily be converted to PNP if needed...you'll need to flip the battery, the electrolytic capacitors, and both of the diodes, then you're ready to go

Phillip


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Is there an ideal gain range for the Ge trasistor in the rangemaster like there is for the fuzz face, or will anything do?



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Col


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I have now built two rangemaster type circuits, a +ve gound and a -ve ground and have modified the -ve ground with the rangeblaster improvements (eg. Ge diode across transistor) some time after it was originally built. All have worked pefectly with the resistor values shown and I have not had to bias any differently. I think I used AC127 pnp transistors in both. I also used 1w resistors throughout to prevent hiss and so far this version has remained temperature stable. There are so few components the extra few pence for the better resistors is negligible. Next to a distortion/fuzz this is the most useful pedal I have ever owned. I can use it to boost solos, thicken up the sound and give a nice slight crunchy overdrive for cleanish parts of songs. The amount of gain is much higher that I expected and I usually use it with the gain knob at around "half past one to two o'clock" on the dial. The rangemaster/rangeblaster project file here makes good reading and explains everything.

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I don't know the sound of the rangemaster with Si transistor but 
I have built a Ge rangemaster trying various ac128 and ac128k NOS with big results. I have used three values of initial condenser: 0,005uF(treble), 0,03uF(mid very good), 0,1uF (bass).Good Range to everybody.



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Hi,


Gains between 65 and 90 are good ones especialy if you deside to use it as distortion unit too. This will add a bit more compresion to the sound. Input cap in this case should be 4,7nF to 6,8 nF.Experiment!Gain about 45 is enough just for treble boost. It's just my opinion!


Success!


 



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I bought a NPN Ge Rangemaster trannie from Small Bear and used that in a Rangeblaster type of circiut. Geofex has a tutorial on the rangemaster and what gains work. I love mine !! It works great in front of my '74 Marshall 1987 and even works well with my POD. I put a selector knob with 7 different input caps but I find myself using 2 wich are either the stock value or slighty larger. The only downside to the circuit is it can be a bit noisey. If I did it again I'd use 1\2 or 1 watt resistors.

http://www.geofex.com/Article_Folders/Rangemaster/atboost.pdf

http://www.smallbearelec.com/home.html

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